Israel Part 4: Tel Aviv and Surprises

It’s the moment you’ve all been waiting for. Tel Aviv! This was my favourite place I visited in Israel and it’s easy to see why. I love cities, beaches, shopping, and food. I got to experience Tel Aviv in two ways, first with the group and then on my own. I can honestly say I liked going on my own a lot better. This is no offence to Birthright by the way. There are pros and cons to tour groups vs on your own travel.

I would highly recommend anyone who is going on Birthright to extend their trip because it really doesn’t cost that much money and you’re already there, explore some more! It’s the same advice I’d give to anyone studying abroad in Europe, stay a little longer and travel afterwards if you can.

Without further ado, here’s my report on Tel Aviv!

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Israel Part 1: Here I come!

Before we talk about Israel, I’ll show you a few videos. The first one is by one of my favourite YouTube channels, Geography Now.

Like Barby said, no matter what I say, someone’s going to get upset and this is a tiny country that really gets people all over the world fired up.

The other one is An Idiot Abroad. This show stars Ricky Gervais’s friend, Karl Pilkington. Ricky sends Karl to random places around the world to laugh at his reactions to things. There is one episode where he goes to Israel. As always, it’s hilarious. Like Karl, I went to the Western Wall not having a clue what this is all about. Unlike Karl, I didn’t have an image of “a place where Jesus was knocking about on a donkey”.

Finally, I’ll share you the trailer for the Hanukkah classic, The Hebrew Hammer. I showed a few of my friends this movie at my very first extremely secular Hanukkah party. The party consisted of latkes, dreidel, lighting birthday candles (because I could not find proper candles in a country where 99.9% of the time I’m the only Jew in a 100 mile radius), and this movie.

Hanukkah 1977, if it weren’t for that TV that is clearly from this decade. 🕎✡️💙

A post shared by Angie Moon (@angiemoonthemod) on

One of my friends loved it and said it might be one of his usual winter holiday movies. I’ll probably reference this movie at some point, along with a couple of others, we’ll see.

For our purposes, this post won’t be political at all, just observations I made during my trip. Later on, I might share my two cents, but my opinion still is not the most informed one.

Let’s go!

Continue reading “Israel Part 1: Here I come!”

Yondr: Better concert experience or going a bit overboard?

Yondr is a San Francisco-based startup that offers a solution to annoying mobile phone addicts at concerts, comedy shows, and even schools. You can even use their system for your wedding or bar/bat mitzvah to keep people from posting unflattering candid pictures online or browsing the internet when they should be paying attention.

They created this pouch that you lock your phone in for the duration of the event. You keep the pouch with you at all times. It can be unlocked with a special device, kind of like the ones shops use to remove anti-shoplifting tags, and used in a designated area, like the lobby.

While it has been around for a few years, I just recently heard about it because a musician on my Facebook newsfeed shared a post mentioning that Jack White is banning phones at his shows with the help of this system.

This got me thinking…

Continue reading “Yondr: Better concert experience or going a bit overboard?”

Planes, trains, and automobiles… And buses and ferries: London and NYC

Sorry about the long post title, but I love referencing movies I like.

As you may know from social media posts, I was in Israel for the past 10 days. How I got there was a story in and of itself.

As Israel is such a controversial topic and I don’t want to start The Diversity of Classic Rock’s 2018 with that, although it will probably be good for views. So we’ll just start off with the amazing journey. Allons-y!

Oh yeah, and I’m going to start getting into making videos again, so I hope you enjoy this video I made about my journey:

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Review: Nosebleeds by The Lost Boys

Track by Track Review: Nosebleeds by The Lost Boys

Southampton indie four piece band The Lost Boys are releasing their debut LP Nosebleeds on January 8 (David Bowie’s and Elvis’s birthday!). Their Indiegogo supporters received their copies just in time for Christmas, but you can purchase the album on iTunes and it is available for streaming on Spotify and Apple Music.

The band kindly sent me a digital copy of their debut LP, thank you so much!

First, a little background on the band: Daniel Ash is the singer, guitarist, and songwriter; James Millar is the bassist, Shaun Ashley plays guitar, and Joel Doherty is the drummer and does some vocals. The band have played the Hammersmith Apollo, Plymouth Pavilions, and The Cavern Club. They’ve opened for legendary musicians like Paul Weller, The Buzzcocks, The Zombies, The Undertones, and The English Beat. They’re definitely a band to keep an eye on.

You can find them on Facebook, Twitter, and Soundcloud.

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Australian Classic Rock of the 60s and 70s: Part 1

I went to Australia for my honeymoon and I absolutely loved it! I hope one day to come back. In the meantime, I’ll just be listening to some great Australian musicians! I’ve been talking about classic rock

Australia has a long rock history starting in the 50s with American rock music arriving there. Australia may be far away, but it isn’t isolated from American culture. The two countries are good friends. By the end of the 50s, pubs were staying open late, rock bands would play, and people would tune into the radio and TV to hear the latest music.

Australian rock music is largely an immigrant history, with many of the most famous Australian rock stars being European-born (mostly UK-born with a few Dutch-born). No doubt, the influences come from the musician’s birth countries, as well as America, where rock and roll began. Many rock bands from around the world made stops in Australia because there’s a significant following there.

Looking at the present, some of the best rock music of today comes from Australia: Tame Impala (Perth), Pond (Perth), King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard (Melbourne), The Babe Rainbow (Byron Bay), and The Murlocs (Melbourne). According to one of my friends who lives in Australia, you can hear classic rock everywhere and it’s a great place to go for those who love the 60s and 70s.

Australia is a great surfing destination and surf rock was very popular here, but one subgenre is very much Australian and got its start here, pub rock. Psychedelic rock and progressive rock also have a following.

Enjoy this A-Z of Australian rock! In the first part, we’ll go from A-F, AC/DC to Fraternity.

Continue reading “Australian Classic Rock of the 60s and 70s: Part 1”

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